7 Followers
3 Following
IntenselyFocused

Intensely Focused

I'm not obsessed, I'm just intensely focued.

Currently reading

Home Improvement: Undead Edition
Charlaine Harris, Toni L.P. Kelner
Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume I
Arthur Conan Doyle
Cinder - Marissa Meyer I really enjoyed this retelling of Cinderella. I loved Kai, Cinder, Peony and Iko. I liked that Kai was more than just a one dimensional prince to fall in love with. I also like the importance Cinder places on knowing who she is.

The Chekhov's gun was blindingly obvious but then, Chekhov's guns usually are.

I really like the world Meyer created although I would also have liked a little more information on how things came to be. I can see people being uncomfortable with cyborgs but I want to know how they came to be regarded as property. After all, these are still sons, daughters, mothers, fathers, wives, husbands, sisters, brothers, etc. of people. If someone I knew were to become injured and need a replacement limb I wouldn't suddenly think of them as something less than human. So how do the laws get passed making them basically slaves? I get that hover accidents are rare but cyborgs are apparently not super rare (at least, I don't think they are) so injuries and replacement parts must still happen somehow. And what qualifies someone as a cyborg? If you have a mechanical heart valve, is that enough? A limb replacement? Or do I have it all wrong and Cinder is only considered as such because she's under the age of majority? But she never says she'll be free when she reaches a certain age which suggests that's not it. Not to mention that they're "drafted" for experimental testing.

What about people who refuse to have replacement parts added? Surely they exist if the alternative is to become property. How are they perceived? Are the laws the same everywhere? Is there reason to think escaping to Europe will mean a better life?

And the chip raises questions, too. Would having a chip installed so as to make it impossible for bioenergy to manipulate you make you a cyborg? What about the fact that it's already been demonstrated such a chip can be tampered with and rendered ineffective?

I want more. Now, please.